muxfind

I posted about two new web-based mixtape services several months ago, muxtape and mixwit. I’ve played with both a bit and listened to a few mixes since. But neither service has taken me away from my primary web listening experiences; tumblr, hype machine, and last.fm.

Then this morning I saw this twitter post by Jen Robinson:


   
      I love it!  Search results for my favorite band on muxfind.  http://muxfind.com/search/?…

Jen was linking to muxfind, a new search tool for muxtapes. This turns me on bigtime.

Ever since delicious and flickr, I’ve loved the idea of searching "user generated content". Not because user generated content is universally good. But because it takes time and effort to post something to the web. Be it a link/url in delicious, a photo to flickr, a video to youtube, a twitter update, or a song. Better yet a playlist. And so that effort in and of itself is a bit of a quality filter. I think of hundreds of things a day. But only a few get to my twitter stream.

Speaking of searching a twitter stream, I watched the Chelsea/Manu match on Summize, a real-time twitter search engine. That was a pretty great way to follow the big match while working on three other things at my office.

The idea of searching user generated audio content is not new. We can listen to the Beatles on HypeMachine. The Hype Machine aggregates music blogs and the mp3s that are uploaded to them. So listening to the Beatles on the Hype Machine is one kind of Beatles playlist.

Now we can listen to the Beatles on muxtape. Since you don’t have to be a music blogger to make a muxtape (you just need to be a playlist maker), it may well be the case that muxtape will get a larger base of users uploading audio content. That will create a different kind of Beatles playlist. Better than the Hype Machine? I don’t know. But certainly different. Right now the muxfind search result page is not a playlist the way a muxtape is. I hope they change that.

We are entering into a new world, where the search engine result page is a media experience in its own right. And that’s an exciting thing to think about.